On creators and their interviewers

Last year I got rejected during a job interview for “not understanding” the concepts of a certain iOS library. What the interviewer didn’t know: I wrote that thing. I actually had a lot of fun during that interview

https://twitter.com/jensravens/status/1282078009017720838

Top Replies by Programmers when their programs don’t work

  • The classical: It works on my machine.
  • How is that possible?
  • It worked yesterday!
  • The person responsible doesn’t work here anymore.
  • I’m sure someone’s changed something.
  • The third-party documentation is wrong.
  • About the previous sentence: The API is wrong.
  • The server is down. (when it is not)
  • The database is down. (I know it’s a lie)
  • It’s a network problem. (I know it’s a lie)
  • I forgot to commit the code that fixes that.
  • About the previous sentence: I undo the GIT update, and it will work again. I swear.
  • It’s never done that before. (I don’t believe it myself)
  • It must be a hardware problem.
  • I haven’t touched that code in weeks! (or better, in months!)
  • About the previous sentence: I’m sure you just changed something.
  • Your data is corrupt! You are corrupt! Leave me alone.
  • I don’t have time to test everything!
  • In reference to the previous sentence: I really want to say, “I haven’t test anything, I was watching youtube videos.”
  • It’s just some unlucky coincidence. That’s just what I haven’t tested.
  • Image for post
  • A woman whose ice cream has fallen image
  • Someone merged the wrong code in GIT and messed up the code.
  • It works, but it hasn’t been tested. (of course, it doesn’t work)
  • Although it gives many errors, the base is stable. (If you audit the code, you’re going to freak out)
  • Someone must have changed my code. (me, yesterday)
  • No one told me it had to work like this.
  • Whatever, you’re the boss, but I think it’s okay.
  • It is the fault of chrome (firefox, opera, safari) or, of course, Internet explorer.
  • It’s my code, and I decide how it has to work.
  • I have no idea what you’re saying right now; I think it is okay.
  • Yesterday I had a bad day.
  • This is an edge case. In other cases, it works well.
  • Your browser must be caching the old content.
  • It must be because of a leap year.
  • Its a character encoding issue.
  • The third-party documentation is wrong.
  • The API is wrong.
  • It’s the version of your system.
  • I forgot to commit the code that fixes that.
  • It’s a problem with your dependencies.
  • It’s a bug in the library.
  • Image for post
  • An incorrect sum
  • But, the code is compiling.
  • The client must have been hacked.
  • I did a quick fix last time.
  • The unit test doesn’t cover that eventuality.
  • This is just a temporary fix.
  • That was literally an unpredictable mistake.
  • I didn’t create that function.
  • That’s interesting, how did you manage to make it do that?
  • I haven’t had any experience with that library.
  • It is because of technical debt. This is a previously known bug.
  • The specifications were ambiguous.
  • I haven’t had time to try it.
  • The fault is yours, and I did not want to show it today. (After several excuses postponing the date)
  • I thought I fixed that.
  • It’s a UX problem.
  • They don’t pay me enough.
  • It is a problem with the antivirus or with the firewall.
  • They have updated the library, and now it causes bugs.
  • The mistake is javascript.
  • Of everything I have developed, just what you want to see does not work.
  • The person responsible doesn’t work here anymore.

Source: The best excuses when we make mistakes programming | by Kesk -*- | JavaScript In Plain English | Medium